Joshua Powell’s paper entitled “Bulk chlorine uptake by polyamide active layers of thin-film composite membranes upon exposure to free chlorine – kinetics, mechanisms, and modeling” has been accepted for publication in Environmental Science and Technology. The paper studies the volume-averaged kinetics, mechanisms and modeling of chlorine uptake by polyamide reverse osmosis membranes upon exposure to […]...
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Our group welcomes Ariel Atkinson, Kasia Grzebyk, John Gilles, and Sabrina Sultana.  Ariel and Kasia joins us as doctoral students, both co-advised with Dr. Howard Weinberg.  John (co-advised with Dr. Mark Sobsey) and Sabrina joins us as Master’s students.  The new members will work on various projects related to the development of new membranes, point-of-use […]...
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Alex Gorzalski, “The Foulant Fighter”, is featured in UNC endeavors for his work on fouling and cleaning of nanofiltration membranes.  The full article can be found at The Foulant Fighter....
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Arianna Catenacci, visiting PhD student, returns to Politecnico di Milano in Italy after a six month visit with our research group.  Our farewell dinner was held at Monterrey Mexican Restaurant.  We will miss her!...
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Josh Powell successfully defends his Masters Technical Report.  Josh studied the degradation of polyamide membranes by free chlorine.  Our group celebrated with dinner at Happy China.  Congratulations Josh!...
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Alex Gorzalski successfully defends his Masters Technical Report.  Alex studied the fouling and optimum cleaning strategies of nanofiltration membranes used to treat groundwaters from North Carolina.  We celebrated with a group dinner at Allen & Sons.  Congratulations Alex!...
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Welcome to the Coronell Research Group

The Coronell Research Group studies physico-chemical processes for water purification with applications at both the treatment plant and point-of-use level.  Research in the Coronell Lab focuses on two main areas: (i) membrane technology, and (ii) redox processes. Our research on membrane technology aims to advance the understanding of the mechanisms of transport of water and contaminants through reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes, and fouling in low-pressure and high-pressure membrane processes. We have pioneered experimental methods for the quantitative characterization of physico-chemical properties of the ultrathin selective barriers of thin-film composite and nanocomposite membranes. We continue to develop characterization methods and use these methods to study membrane aging, membrane fouling and the relationship between membrane physico-chemical properties and performance. We also use the characterization methods to facilitate the development of improved membranes. Our work on redox processes currently focuses on the development of point-of-use systems for the removal of heavy metals including copper and lead. Our redox studies focus on characterizing reaction kinetics and mechanisms to facilitate the optimization of operational parameters. Applied projects addressing specific needs of plants or municipalities are also in progress.